The Good Gals Project

Celebrating Female Characters!

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Original article at The Mary Sue:
GRACIE HART
If we’re delving into mainstream characters we’d never otherwise get to talk about, there was no way we weren’t sticking a romantic comedy up in here, and there was just no way to ignore the oeuvre of Sandra Bullock. Of all her roles, her character in 2000′s Miss Congeniality is one of the ones that charms us the most. This is in large part because Gracie Hart, a tough-as-nails FBI agent, is kind of a train wreck in a lot of ways that romantic comedy heroines aren’t as often allowed to be train wrecks: she’s completely unpolished, lacks any semblance of table manners, and it’s probably been a very long time since she really ran a brush through her hair — Michael Caine’s character even calls her “Dirty Harriette.” And the best part is that she doesn’t really give a crap. She’s good at her job, and from what we see, she doesn’t really have many complaints about her life — she doesn’t get made over because she wants to get some guy. She gets made over because it’s all part of the plan to save a few hundred lives.
When she enters the Miss United States pageant (oh, and did we mention that’s where we meet William Shatner?), her exterior may be newly minted and shiny, but other than that, the only transformation of self Gracie Hart goes through is the warm glow she gets from accepting the different types of women she can now be friends with (yeah, yeah, it’s a romantic comedy, there’s bound to be some of that). Other than that, she is still the gruff, mostly-ill-mannered, blunt career woman who would much rather be guzzling beers with her co-workers or practicing at the shooting range than worrying about possible runs in her pantyhose. And she gets the guy, but it’s much more pressing that she stopped William Shatner from being blown to bits.

Original article at The Mary Sue:

GRACIE HART

If we’re delving into mainstream characters we’d never otherwise get to talk about, there was no way we weren’t sticking a romantic comedy up in here, and there was just no way to ignore the oeuvre of Sandra Bullock. Of all her roles, her character in 2000′s Miss Congeniality is one of the ones that charms us the most. This is in large part because Gracie Hart, a tough-as-nails FBI agent, is kind of a train wreck in a lot of ways that romantic comedy heroines aren’t as often allowed to be train wrecks: she’s completely unpolished, lacks any semblance of table manners, and it’s probably been a very long time since she really ran a brush through her hair — Michael Caine’s character even calls her “Dirty Harriette.” And the best part is that she doesn’t really give a crap. She’s good at her job, and from what we see, she doesn’t really have many complaints about her life — she doesn’t get made over because she wants to get some guy. She gets made over because it’s all part of the plan to save a few hundred lives.

When she enters the Miss United States pageant (oh, and did we mention that’s where we meet William Shatner?), her exterior may be newly minted and shiny, but other than that, the only transformation of self Gracie Hart goes through is the warm glow she gets from accepting the different types of women she can now be friends with (yeah, yeah, it’s a romantic comedy, there’s bound to be some of that). Other than that, she is still the gruff, mostly-ill-mannered, blunt career woman who would much rather be guzzling beers with her co-workers or practicing at the shooting range than worrying about possible runs in her pantyhose. And she gets the guy, but it’s much more pressing that she stopped William Shatner from being blown to bits.

Filed under character appreciation film characters miss congeniality gracie hart sandra bullock

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Persona: 30 Day Challenge. Day 1: Your Favorite Character.

Minato Arisato

pretty-jesus:

It’s hard to choose from all the characters in the game any of the Persona games… I’ve played from the series. They’re all full of personality, even the main character you play as exhibits a lot of personality, regardless of what you choose. I feel like, because of what the dialogue given to you to choose from in each main character, you can tell how the person would react to it, but with your personal choice or preference, you choose what he says. Basically he/she is thinking of those selections, but you choose what to say, so you can tell how the character thinks just from what’s given to you. 

Anyways, back to the point. My favorite overall character would have to be Miss Persona 3 Main Protagonist.

Or as she is dubbed as in the United States, Miss Minako Arisato in the lesser known P3P.

Originally Minato Arisato was the name of the main protagonist of the main game, Persona 3. “ko” is the suffix in Japanese to a girl’s name, giving her that name.

The reason to why I pick this character is because her personality is different from that other male protagonist of the Personas I have played. Minato Arisato (Persona 3) is really reserved, and quiet. Definitely quite the introvert, and one reason I’d to believe he is so quiet is because of the hardships he has dealt with, but that’s another story. Yu Narukami (Persona 4) is more of an extrovert than that of the original Persona 3 Main Protagonist. Personally, he is more of a mature man, as well. He carries himself well, he is older, taller, and more stable than Minato. But at times, he seems to be more of a gloomy type of person, and rather cold. He was almost at a tie for my favorite character, but he is what is expected of the persona protagonist. Having the cool, calm, collected attitude.

Minako Arisato is very upbeat, bubbly, lively and definitely more outspoken than the other protagonist. There are more dialogue in her story than that of the other main character you play as. She is definitely more involved and more caring about the members of SEES than Minato. She would be definitely in my book more of a hero, than Minato, because she truly shows more care and more concern about the others rather than just being to herself. The fact that she is also lively, and optimistic is an up, too. Especially since in her story, she has to deal with the same things Minato has had to deal with, and she’s strong enough to keep her head up high and be as happy and cheery as one can be, rather than just to leave a head down and hands in pocket with no confidence (cough cough Minato). I like Minato, he’s a good character, and all, it’s just the whole shy, mysteriousness is a too much for me. This is a hard decision, but hands down. Minako Arisato of Persona 3 Portable is my favorite character of the Persona Series.

(via pretty-jesus-deactivated2013021)

Filed under character appreciation female characters persona megaten game characters

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mendaciousangel:


20 Favorite Female TV Characters
7. Spencer Hastings
I LOVE Spencer Hastings. Spencer is written in a way that I wish more teenage girls are written. Does Spencer like boys? Yes. Does Spencer have a boyfriend? Yes. Does Spencer spend all her time mooning, fighting or thinking about boys? No. Spencer is athletic, smart as hell and is almost always solving the groups problems.
She is a fierce friend and probably the show’s best snoop. She is the one who usually makes the tough decisions about whether or not they’ll go to the cops, etc etc. Spencer also has the best lines, always the one to make the audience laugh.
Added to that, I love her relationship with Toby. At first they had the star crossed lovers thing going on, because Toby was suspected of killing Allison, and everyone was like stay away. Spencer believed in Toby, disobeyed her family and stood by her man.

mendaciousangel:

20 Favorite Female TV Characters

7. Spencer Hastings

I LOVE Spencer Hastings. Spencer is written in a way that I wish more teenage girls are written. Does Spencer like boys? Yes. Does Spencer have a boyfriend? Yes. Does Spencer spend all her time mooning, fighting or thinking about boys? No. Spencer is athletic, smart as hell and is almost always solving the groups problems.

She is a fierce friend and probably the show’s best snoop. She is the one who usually makes the tough decisions about whether or not they’ll go to the cops, etc etc. Spencer also has the best lines, always the one to make the audience laugh.

Added to that, I love her relationship with Toby. At first they had the star crossed lovers thing going on, because Toby was suspected of killing Allison, and everyone was like stay away. Spencer believed in Toby, disobeyed her family and stood by her man.

Filed under tv characters female characters character appreciation spencer hastings pretty little liars

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Original article at The Mary Sue:
JENNY MELLOR
Like a strange mix of Peggy Olson and Tyra Collette, Jenny Mellor (An Education) is a girl before her time, facing the uneven circumstances she was given in 1961, Pre-Beatles London. She’s spent her entire life steeped over books, learning French and Latin, reading classic literature, listening to French music. Her entire formal education is overseen by her father, with one set goal: to get her into Oxford. She’s lived her entire life inside, studying, preparing for a future which, for women at the time (before true 1960s Britain exploded with color and life and opportunity and everything changed) seemed to be comprised of being a schoolteacher and spending another forty years inside, studying. That, or get married off.
Then Jenny Mallor met David Goldman, an older man who could offer her everything. Or at least, if not everything, some of the things she’d been missing before. Exposing her to the excitement and culture of “Adult” life, Peter promised her the world, charming her parents into approving of the relationship, and even proposing marriage. Jenny leaves school, sure that she is in for a world of adventure. It’s as she tells her headmistress:


Headmistress: Nobody does anything worth doing without a degree.Jenny: Nobody does anything worth doing WITH a degree. No woman anyway.Headmistress: So what I do isn’t worth doing? Or what Miss Stubbs does, or Mrs. Wilson, or any of us here? Because none of us would be here without a degree. You do realize that, don’t you? And yes, of course studying is hard and boring…Jenny: Boring!Headmistress: I’m sorry?Jenny: Studying is hard and boring. Teaching is hard and boring. So, what you’re telling me is to be bored, and then bored, and finally bored again, but this time for the rest of my life? This whole stupid country is bored! There’s no life in it, or color, or fun! It’s probably just as well the Russians are going to drop a nuclear bomb on us any day now. So my choice is to do something hard and boring, or to marry my… Jew, and go to Paris and Rome and listen to jazz, and read, and eat good food in nice restaurants, and have fun! It’s not enough to educate us anymore Ms. Walters. You’ve got to tell us why you’re doing it.


Sure enough, Peter turns out to be not quite the man she’d been building up in her head, and her plan crashes down around her. Luckily for her, her little detour into romance was more self-sacrificing than any real indication of who she was; she was always more than some silly schoolgirl, and she still had worlds of wits about her — along with some wisdom she’d gained along the way. She realizes the value of an education, gets into Oxford, and presumably uses the wisdom she gained at such a young age to conquer the world as time went on.

Original article at The Mary Sue:

JENNY MELLOR

Like a strange mix of Peggy Olson and Tyra Collette, Jenny Mellor (An Education) is a girl before her time, facing the uneven circumstances she was given in 1961, Pre-Beatles London. She’s spent her entire life steeped over books, learning French and Latin, reading classic literature, listening to French music. Her entire formal education is overseen by her father, with one set goal: to get her into Oxford. She’s lived her entire life inside, studying, preparing for a future which, for women at the time (before true 1960s Britain exploded with color and life and opportunity and everything changed) seemed to be comprised of being a schoolteacher and spending another forty years inside, studying. That, or get married off.

Then Jenny Mallor met David Goldman, an older man who could offer her everything. Or at least, if not everything, some of the things she’d been missing before. Exposing her to the excitement and culture of “Adult” life, Peter promised her the world, charming her parents into approving of the relationship, and even proposing marriage. Jenny leaves school, sure that she is in for a world of adventure. It’s as she tells her headmistress:

Headmistress: Nobody does anything worth doing without a degree.
Jenny: Nobody does anything worth doing WITH a degree. No woman anyway.
Headmistress: So what I do isn’t worth doing? Or what Miss Stubbs does, or Mrs. Wilson, or any of us here? Because none of us would be here without a degree. You do realize that, don’t you? And yes, of course studying is hard and boring…
Jenny: Boring!
Headmistress: I’m sorry?
Jenny: Studying is hard and boring. Teaching is hard and boring. So, what you’re telling me is to be bored, and then bored, and finally bored again, but this time for the rest of my life? This whole stupid country is bored! There’s no life in it, or color, or fun! It’s probably just as well the Russians are going to drop a nuclear bomb on us any day now. So my choice is to do something hard and boring, or to marry my… Jew, and go to Paris and Rome and listen to jazz, and read, and eat good food in nice restaurants, and have fun! It’s not enough to educate us anymore Ms. Walters. You’ve got to tell us why you’re doing it.

Sure enough, Peter turns out to be not quite the man she’d been building up in her head, and her plan crashes down around her. Luckily for her, her little detour into romance was more self-sacrificing than any real indication of who she was; she was always more than some silly schoolgirl, and she still had worlds of wits about her — along with some wisdom she’d gained along the way. She realizes the value of an education, gets into Oxford, and presumably uses the wisdom she gained at such a young age to conquer the world as time went on.

Filed under jenny mellor an education film characters character appreciation female characters

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Original article at Flavorwire:
Hester Prynne, The Scarlet Letter
Though Hester Prynne, who is condemned by her Puritan neighbors for having a child out of wedlock, is sometimes seen as a victim, she manages to survive with dignity and faith throughout, which we think makes her pretty darn powerful. NPR has described her as being “among the first and most important female protagonists in American literature. She’s the embodiment of deep contradictions: bad and beautiful, holy and sinful, conventional and radical… [she] can be seen as Hawthorne’s literary contemplation of what happens when women break cultural bounds and gain personal power.”

Original article at Flavorwire:

Hester Prynne, The Scarlet Letter

Though Hester Prynne, who is condemned by her Puritan neighbors for having a child out of wedlock, is sometimes seen as a victim, she manages to survive with dignity and faith throughout, which we think makes her pretty darn powerful. NPR has described her as being “among the first and most important female protagonists in American literature. She’s the embodiment of deep contradictions: bad and beautiful, holy and sinful, conventional and radical… [she] can be seen as Hawthorne’s literary contemplation of what happens when women break cultural bounds and gain personal power.”

Filed under character appreciation female characters hester prynne the scarlet letter literary characters nathaniel hawthorne

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Original article at The Mary Sue:
MULAN
Growing up in the ’90s was a pretty good time to witness some kick-ass Disney princesses. Ariel was an adventurer (let’s not talk about the giving-up-her-voice-for-a-man thing right now), Jasmine wouldn’t allow herself to be bought or sold into marriage, Belle read books (let’s not talk about the Stockholm Syndrome thing right now), Pocahontas probably saved a bunch of people from massacre. And Mulan. Oh, Mulan. She was perhaps the most kick-ass of them all. Never quite knowing how to fit into her society’s view of femininity, her family had all but given up hope that they’d able to marry her off. Everyone around her pretty much just thought she was uncouth and unfit for public display, and in a time when a woman’s worth was measured by her marriageability and her ability to bear sons, this was considered a great shame. Mulan was most definitely another woman on this list who lived far before her time.
But when the Chinese war against the Huns was announced, and her injured father’s name announced as one of the soldier’s required to go off and fight for the crime, Mulan did something undeniably brave: she enlisted herself. Cutting off her hair, tying down her breasts, and stealing her father’s armor, she brought new meaning to the concept of “honor.” She had no romantic alternate motivations; this was a girl who had her priorities straight. She was just a girl fighting for her family and her country all at the same time, and putting her life in danger in multiple ways in the process — she could easily die in the war, and if she were caught masquerading as a man the punishment might be death anyway.
Naturally, she doesn’t get the hang of soldier life right off the bat. With the help (and hindrance) of a tiny ancestral dragon named Eddie Murphy Mushu and a rather hunky captain, she slowly and surely making herself into the best damn warrior the Chinese army has ever seen (through one of the best training montages/songs we’ve ever seen, by the way).
Unfortunately, when an injury unwittingly reveals her true sex, she loses the trust of her peers. Luckily for them, this doesn’t do one bit to change her personality and she spends much of the rest of the movie saving their asses. In the end she saves all of China (and in the process gets all her male peers to dress in female drag), gets the commendation of the Chinese Emperor, the honor and respect she so wanted from her family and community, AND THEN she gets the guy. (An added bonus, really.) She gains acceptance for being exactly who she is, and who she is is pretty badass. As the emperor said, “you don’t meet a girl like that every dynasty.”
It should also be noted that, in one incarnation of the myth of Mulan, Mulan got pregnant, gave birth on the battlefield, and then proceeded to get right back up and fight. Now that’s what we call dedication.
We should also note that yes, we do cover Disney characters a lot. But come on: what’s more mainstream than Disney?

Original article at The Mary Sue:

MULAN

Growing up in the ’90s was a pretty good time to witness some kick-ass Disney princesses. Ariel was an adventurer (let’s not talk about the giving-up-her-voice-for-a-man thing right now), Jasmine wouldn’t allow herself to be bought or sold into marriage, Belle read books (let’s not talk about the Stockholm Syndrome thing right now), Pocahontas probably saved a bunch of people from massacre. And Mulan. Oh, Mulan. She was perhaps the most kick-ass of them all. Never quite knowing how to fit into her society’s view of femininity, her family had all but given up hope that they’d able to marry her off. Everyone around her pretty much just thought she was uncouth and unfit for public display, and in a time when a woman’s worth was measured by her marriageability and her ability to bear sons, this was considered a great shame. Mulan was most definitely another woman on this list who lived far before her time.

But when the Chinese war against the Huns was announced, and her injured father’s name announced as one of the soldier’s required to go off and fight for the crime, Mulan did something undeniably brave: she enlisted herself. Cutting off her hair, tying down her breasts, and stealing her father’s armor, she brought new meaning to the concept of “honor.” She had no romantic alternate motivations; this was a girl who had her priorities straight. She was just a girl fighting for her family and her country all at the same time, and putting her life in danger in multiple ways in the process — she could easily die in the war, and if she were caught masquerading as a man the punishment might be death anyway.

Naturally, she doesn’t get the hang of soldier life right off the bat. With the help (and hindrance) of a tiny ancestral dragon named Eddie Murphy Mushu and a rather hunky captain, she slowly and surely making herself into the best damn warrior the Chinese army has ever seen (through one of the best training montages/songs we’ve ever seen, by the way).

Unfortunately, when an injury unwittingly reveals her true sex, she loses the trust of her peers. Luckily for them, this doesn’t do one bit to change her personality and she spends much of the rest of the movie saving their asses. In the end she saves all of China (and in the process gets all her male peers to dress in female drag), gets the commendation of the Chinese Emperor, the honor and respect she so wanted from her family and community, AND THEN she gets the guy. (An added bonus, really.) She gains acceptance for being exactly who she is, and who she is is pretty badass. As the emperor said, “you don’t meet a girl like that every dynasty.”

It should also be noted that, in one incarnation of the myth of Mulan, Mulan got pregnant, gave birth on the battlefield, and then proceeded to get right back up and fight. Now that’s what we call dedication.

We should also note that yes, we do cover Disney characters a lot. But come on: what’s more mainstream than Disney?

Filed under character appreciation female characters mulan disney movie characters

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Original article at The Jane Dough:
Harriet From Harriet The Spy
While this may be the most juvenille of the books on our list, who doesn’t love Harriet?! Harriet from Louise Fitzhugh’s Harriet The Spy is a spunky, 11-year-old girl with ambitions to write and spy on her neighbors. Through this adorable story of mischief and friendship, Harriet learns that sometimes words can hurt. And in a story about self-growth, she eventually succeeds and becomes editor of her school newspaper. Definitely a good book for younger girls. 

Original article at The Jane Dough:

Harriet From Harriet The Spy

While this may be the most juvenille of the books on our list, who doesn’t love Harriet?! Harriet from Louise Fitzhugh’s Harriet The Spy is a spunky, 11-year-old girl with ambitions to write and spy on her neighbors. Through this adorable story of mischief and friendship, Harriet learns that sometimes words can hurt. And in a story about self-growth, she eventually succeeds and becomes editor of her school newspaper. Definitely a good book for younger girls. 

Filed under character appreciation female characters literary characters harriet the spy louise fitzhugh

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